45 Natural Ways To Lower High Blood Pressure

By on August 3, 2015
Blood Pressure words on a thermometer measuring your hypertension, with level rising past normal, elevated and danger to burst at maximum point

What is High Blood Pressure?

High blood pressure (HBP) is a serious condition that can lead to coronary heart disease, heart failure, stroke, kidney failure, and other health problems.

“Blood pressure” is the force of blood pushing against the walls of the arteries as the heart pumps blood. If this pressure rises and stays high over time, it can damage the body in many ways.

Hypertension risk factors include obesity, drinking too much alcohol, smoking, and family history. High blood pressure is also known as “the silent killer”-affects 1 in 3 adult Americans, or roughly 67 million people, and that number only continues to grow every year.

So we gathered as much information on how to lower down high blood pressure in natural ways.

Healthy Diet

Eating a diet that is rich in whole grains, fruits, vegetables and low-fat dairy products and skimps on saturated fat and cholesterol can lower your blood pressure by up to 14 mm Hg. This eating plan is known as the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) diet.

1. White Beans

One cup of white beans provides 13% of the calcium, 30% of the magnesium, and 24% of the potassium you need every day.

You can use this comfort food in side dishes, soups, and entrées. As a meatless source of protein, it’s a great choice for vegetarians. Choose no-salt added or well-rinsed low-sodium canned white beans, or cook dried beans overnight in a slow cooker. Read more. . .

2. Pork Tenderloin

srf-pork-tenderloin_5Photo: Snake River Farms

Three ounces of pork tenderloin provide 6% of the magnesium and 15% of the potassium you need every day.

Meat lovers, rejoice! This lean cut provides plenty of meaty flavor and satisfaction without the overload of saturated fat found in fattier types of beef and pork. Cook larger tenderloins (or do several on the grill or in the oven) and store leftovers in the refrigerator or freezer for fast weeknight meals. Read more. . .

3. Fat-free Plain Yogurt

One cup of fat-free plain yogurt provides 49% of the calcium, 12% of the magnesium, and 18% of the potassium you need every day.

Cool and creamy, yogurt is a star ingredient in mineral-rich breakfasts, in sauces and salad dressings, and even in entrées. Most brands of regular yogurt tend to be a bit higher in calcium than Greek varieties. Read more. . .

4. Tilapia

Four ounces of tilapia provides 8% of the magnesium and 8% of the potassium you need every day.

This mild white fish is available year-round in supermarkets and fish stores, fresh or as frozen fillets. You can roast it, bake it, and sauté it, flavor it with a variety of seasonings, and even top it with mineral-rich kiwi-avocado salsa. Tilapia is extremely low in environmental toxins like mercury and PCBs (polychlorinated biphenyls), and it is considered a sustainable, environmentally friendly choice. Read more. . .

5. Kiwi

kiwi-natural-remedy-for-many-diseases-featured1Photo: Healthy Food House

One kiwifruit provides 2% of the calcium, 7% of the magnesium, and 9% of the potassium you need every day.

Kiwifruit is available year-round in supermarkets, hailing from California orchards November through May and from New Zealand June through October. (Kiwifruit was named after New Zealand’s native kiwi bird, whose brown, fuzzy coat resembles the skin of this fruit.) Ripe kiwis can be stored in the fridge or on your counter. They contain more vitamin C than a same-size serving of orange slices. Read more. . .

6. Peaches and Nectarines

One medium peach or nectarine provides 1% of the calcium, 3% of the magnesium, and 8% of the potassium you need every day.

Frozen unsweetened peach slices are a great alternative to fresh peaches and nectarines. Just defrost ahead of time or, for smoothies, simply toss in the blender. Read more. . .

7. Bananas

Bananas-Great-Food-Pre-Post-WorkoutPhoto: Melleum.com

One medium banana provides 1% of the calcium, 8% of the magnesium, and 12% of the potassium you need every day. No need to toss soft bananas when the skin turns brown. Peel, bag, and freeze for use in smoothies. Read more. . .

8. Kale

One cup of kale, raw or cooked, provides 9% of the calcium, 6% of the magnesium, and 9% of the potassium you need every day.

Low in calories, kale is widely considered a superfood because it contains a big dose of cell-protecting antioxidants as well as alpha-linolenic acid, a plant-based good fat that cools inflammation. Thin, delicate baby kale leaves are a great alternative for salads. Read more. . .

9. Red Bell Pepper

One cup of raw red bell pepper provides 1% of the calcium, 4% of the magnesium, and 9% of the potassium you need every day.

Red bell peppers keep in the refrigerator for up to 10 days. Store wrapped in a slightly damp paper towel so they don’t dry out. You can freeze extras to use later in cooked dishes. Read more. . .

10. Watermelon

watermelonPhoto: Hyper City India

Every morning, be faithful to watermelon. Often times watermelon as viewed as a strictly summer fruit, one for seed spitting contests and barbecues, but it can also help lower blood pressure. An organic compound called citrulline, an a-amino acid, was first isolated in 1914 from watermelon. Once ingested, the body can convert citrulline to the amino acid L-arginine, which is a precursor to nitric oxide.

To translate, citrulline-found in watermelon- is converted into arginine-essentially a chemical building block-which leads to the production of nitric oxide. Nitric oxide talks to various cells and systems in your body that regulates, among other things, how hard your blood gets pumped through your entire body-also known as vascular systematic resistance. It will widen blood vessels, which lowers vascular resistance, which ultimately lowers blood pressure. Imagine trying to pump a certain volume of liquid through a small opening versus a wider opening. The wider opening will allow it to flow smoothly and easily-it’s the same with blood cells! Read more. . .

11. Broccoli

One cup of cooked broccoli provides 6% of the calcium, 8% of the magnesium, and 14% of the potassium you need every day.

This cruciferous veggie is also a famous source of cancer-fighting phytonutrients called glucosinolates. You can substitute frozen broccoli in many cooked entrées and side dishes. Read more. . .

12. Sweet Potato

10-Reasons-Why-Sweet-Potatoes-Are-Perfect-For-DiabeticsPhoto: Healthy Food For

One medium sweet potato with the skin provides 4% of the calcium, 8% of the magnesium (7% without the skin), and 15% of the potassium (10% without the skin) you need every day.

So sweet it could be a dessert, sweet potatoes are a great addition to smoothies. Bake several sweet potatoes at one time so you’ll have a ready supply for quick smoothies and other recipes. Read more. . .

13. Quinoa

A half-cup of cooked quinoa provides 1.5% of the calcium, 15% of the magnesium, and 4.5% of the potassium you need every day.

There’s a reason the United Nations declared 2013 the International Year of Quinoa. This high-protein whole grain has a mild yet nutty flavor, contains a variety of health-protecting phytonutrients along with an impressive amount of magnesium, and cooks in less than half the time it takes to make brown rice. Quinoa is gluten free, making it a great option if you’re gluten intolerant or have celiac disease. The most widely available quinoa is a golden beige color, but red and black varieties are also available and worth a try. Read more. . .

14. Coconut Water

Coconut water is found inside the shell of green, unripe coconuts that retains its natural benefits in organic and raw form. It contains potassium and magnesium, both of which relate to regular muscle function, and of course, the heart is a big giant muscle. While there have been some limited studies on the effect of coconut water on hypertension, many people report anecdotally that it has helped lower blood pressure. In studies, it seemed to particularly affect systolic blood pressure, or the force that takes place when the heart pumps blood away from it. If you don’t have a problem with coconut water, it may prove to be a solid remedy for you. Read more. . . 

15. Avocado

Avocado-1Photo: Food Facts Index

One-half of an avocado provides 1% of the calcium, 5% of the magnesium, and 10% of the potassium you need every day.

In addition to pressure-soothing minerals and heart-healthy monounsaturated fats, avocados contain health-promoting carotenoids. Peel carefully; the dark green flesh just under an avocado’s brittle skin contains large amounts of these disease-fighting compounds. Read more. . .

16. Potato

Aim for potassium levels of 2,000 to 4,000 mg a day. Top sources of potassium-rich produce include sweet potatoes, tomatoes, orange juice, potatoes, bananas, kidney beans, peas, cantaloupe, honeydew melon, and dried fruits such as prunes and raisins. Read more. . .

17. Dark Chocolate

Dark chocolate varieties contain flavanols that make blood vessels more elastic. In one study, 18% of patients who ate it every day saw blood pressure decrease. Have ½ ounce daily (make sure it contains at least 70% cocoa). Read more. . .

18. Fish Oil

fish-oil-dog-foodPhoto: Dogs Naturally Magazine

Omega-3 fatty acids are essential fatty acids that are found in fish and some plant foods. The available research in humans suggests that they may help lower blood pressure in people with high blood pressure. The omega-3 fatty acid DHA may have greater benefits than EPA (eicosapentaenooic acid). Read more. . .

19. Magnesium

The results are mixed on whether the mineral magnesium may help lower blood pressure, with a number of studies suggesting a small but significant in reduction in blood pressure. A 2012 meta-analysis concluded that magnesium supplementation reduced blood pressure by 2-3mmHg for diastolic blood pressure and 3-4mmHg for systolic blood pressure. Read more. . .

Herbal Remedies

You can lower your blood pressure without medication. One of the best way to do that is go natural and when it comes to natural remedies, many herbs have been proven to be effective.

20. Basil

Bunch-of-BasilPhoto: Living Awareness

Basil is a delicious herb that goes well in a variety of foods. It also might help lower your blood pressure. Extract of basil has been shown to lower blood pressure, although only briefly. Adding fresh basil to your diet is easy and certainly can’t hurt. Keep a small pot of the herb in your kitchen garden and add the fresh leaves to pastas, soups, salads, and casseroles. Read more. . .

21. Cinnamon

Cinnamon is another tasty seasoning that requires little effort to include in your daily diet, and that may bring your blood pressure numbers down. Consuming cinnamon every day has been shown to lower blood pressure in people with diabetes. Read more. . .

22. Cardamom

Cardamom seeds on a white backgroundPhoto: Commodity Online

Cardamom is a seasoning that comes from India and is often used in the foods of South Asia. A study investigating the health effects of cardamom found that participants given powdered cardamom daily for several months saw significant reductions in their blood pressure readings. Read more. . .

23. Garlic

This pungent seasoning can do more than just flavor your food and ruin your breath. Garlic has the ability to lower your blood pressure by causing your blood vessels to relax and dilate. This lets blood flow more freely and reduces blood pressure. Read more. . .

24. Hibiscus

Hibiscus tea (from the plant Hibiscus sabdariffa) and supplements have been found to lower blood pressure in human studies. A systematic review of four randomized controlled trials found that in two studies testing the effects of hibiscus tea to black tea, hibiscus tea was associated with reduced systolic and diastolic blood pressure. Read more. . .

25. Hawthorn

hawthorne-berry2Photo: Big Ben Central

Hawthorn is an herbal remedy for high blood pressure that has been used in traditional Chinese medicines for thousands of years. Decoctions of hawthorn seem to have a whole host of benefits on cardiovascular health, including reduction of blood pressure, the prevention of clot formation, and an increase in blood circulation. You can take hawthorn as a pill, a liquid extract, or a tea. Read more. . .

26. Celery Seed

Celery seed is an herb used to flavor soups, stews, casseroles, and other savory dishes. Celery has been long used to treat hypertension in China, but studies also shown that it may be effective. You can use the seeds to lower blood pressure, but you can also juice the whole plant. Celery is a diuretic, which may help explain its effect on blood pressure. Read more. . .

27. French Lavender

The beautiful, perfume-like scent of lavender is not the only useful aspect of the plant. Oil of lavender has long been used as a perfume ingredient and also to induce relaxation. The herb may also lower your blood pressure. Although not many people think to use lavender as a culinary herb, you can use the flowers in baked goods and the leaves can be used in the same way you would use rosemary. Read more. . .

28. Cats Claw

dsc_0867Photo: Healthy Fig

Cat’s claw is an herbal medicine used in traditional Chinese practice to treat hypertension as well as neurological health problems. Studies of cat’s claw as a treatment for hypertension indicate that it may be helpful in reducing blood pressure by acting on calcium channels in your cells. You can get cat’s claw in supplement form from many health food stores. Read more. . .

Lifestyle Changes

The more changes you make, the more benefit you will gain and the greater the effect is likely to be on lowering your blood pressure. In fact some people find that, by sticking to a healthy lifestyle, they don’t need to take any medicines at all.

29. Lose Extra Pounds

Blood pressure often increases as weight increases. Being overweight also can cause disrupted breathing while you sleep (sleep apnea), which further raises your blood pressure. Read more. . .

30. Exercise Regularly

exercise

Regular physical activity — at least 30 minutes most days of the week — can lower your blood pressure by 4 to 9 millimeters of mercury (mm Hg). It’s important to be consistent because if you stop exercising, your blood pressure can rise again. Read more. . .

31. Work A Bit Less

Putting in more than 41 hours per week at the office raises your risk of hypertension by 15%, according to a University of California, Irvine, study of 24,205 California residents. Overtime makes it hard to exercise and eat healthy, says Haiou Yang, PhD, the lead researcher. Read more. . .

32. Limit The Amount of Alcohol You Drink

Alcohol can be both good and bad for your health. In small amounts, it can potentially lower your blood pressure by 2 to 4 mm Hg. Read more. . .

33. Quit Smoking

Stop-SmokingPhoto: No Camels.com

Each cigarette you smoke increases your blood pressure for many minutes after you finish. Quitting smoking helps your blood pressure return to normal. People who quit smoking, regardless of age, have substantial increases in life expectancy. Read more. . .

34. Breath Deeply

Slow breathing and meditative practices such as qigong, yoga, and tai chi decrease stress hormones, which elevate renin, a kidney enzyme that raises blood pressure. Try 5 minutes in the morning and at night. Inhale deeply and expand your belly. Exhale and release all of your tension. Read more. . .

35. Go Decaf or Cut Back on Caffeine

The role caffeine plays in blood pressure is still debated. Caffeine can raise blood pressure by as much as 10 mm Hg in people who rarely consume it, but there is little to no strong effect on blood pressure in habitual coffee drinkers. Read more. . .

36. Reduce Sodium Intake

Message about excessive salt consumption.Photo: US News

Too much sodium may lead to fluid retention which can raise blood pressure, especially in people who are sensitive to sodium. It is estimated that 60 percent of people with essential hypertension may decrease their blood pressure to some degree by reducing their sodium intake. Read more. . .

37. Take Up Tea

Lowering high blood pressure is as easy as one, two, tea: Study participants who sipped 3 cups of a hibiscus tea daily lowered systolic blood pressure by 7 points in 6 weeks on average, say researchers from Tufts University—results on par with many prescription medications. Those who received a placebo drink improved their reading by only 1 point. Read more. . .

38. Relax With Music

Need to bring down your blood pressure a bit more than medication or lifestyle changes can do alone? The right tunes can help, according to researchers at the University of Florence in Italy. They asked 28 adults who were already taking hypertension pills to listen to soothing classical, Celtic, or Indian music for 30 minutes daily while breathing slowly. After a week, the listeners had lowered their average systolic reading by 3.2 points; a month later, readings were down 4.4 points. Read more. . .

39. Seek Help For Snoring

couple-snoringPhoto: Neurological Wellness

It’s time to heed your partner’s complaints and get that snoring checked out. Loud, incessant snores are one of the main symptoms of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). University of Alabama researchers found that many sleep apnea sufferers also had high levels of aldosterone, a hormone that can boost blood pressure. In fact, it’s estimated that half of all people with sleep apnea have high blood pressure. Read more. . .

40. Reduce Your Stress

Chronic stress is an important contributor to high blood pressure. Occasional stress also can contribute to high blood pressure if you react to stress by eating unhealthy food, drinking alcohol or smoking. Take some time to think about what causes you to feel stressed, such as work, family, finances or illness. Once you know what’s causing your stress, consider how you can eliminate or reduce stress. Read more. . .

Mind and Body Interventions

There is now considerable evidence that an array of mind-body therapies can be used as effective adjuncts to conventional medical treatment for a number of common clinical conditions including high blood pressure.

41. Yoga

An ancient system of relaxation, exercise and healing with origins in Indian philosophy, yoga is often practiced to improve the wellbeing of the mind and body. It is also recommended for medical conditions, with the strongest evidence supporting its use as a treatment for high blood pressure. Read more. . .

42. Meditation

Mindfulness-Meditation

The regular practice of meditation may help to reduce stress and lower blood pressure, though many of the available studies have had methodological issues. Further research is needed. Read more. . .

43. Qi Gong

A form of traditional Chinese medicine, qi gong may benefit people with high blood pressure. Some preliminary studies suggest that high blood pressure in pregnancy may be partially controlled with internal qi gong (a self-guided technique involving meditation, gentle movement, and sound). Read more. . .

44. Autogenic Training

A technique used for stress reduction and relaxation. It involves a series of sessions in which people learn how to control breathing, blood pressure, heart rate, and body temperature.

People learn six exercises that each involve a certain posture (e.g reclining in a chair), concentration without a goal, imagination, and verbal cues. Each exercise is learned by watching a teacher demonstrate it or by reading a description. Read more. . .

45. Biofeedback

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A technique in which people learn how to gain control over internal body processes that normally occur involuntarily, such as blood pressure, heart rate, muscle tension, and skin temperature.

Biofeedback is primarily used for high blood pressure, migraine, tension headache, chronic pain, and urinary incontinence. Read more. . .

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Resources:

http://www.prevention.com/food/13-power-foods-lower-blood-pressure-naturally
http://everydayroots.com/high-blood-pressure-remedies
http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/high-blood-pressure/in-depth/high-blood-pressure/art-20046974
http://altmedicine.about.com/cs/herbsvitaminsek/a/Hypertension.htm

 

One Comment

  1. How to lower high blood preasure

    October 3, 2015 at 7:47 am

    Keep this going please, great job!

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